Why do peers want you in the room?
Mickey McManus

Why would somebody, one of your peers say, ah, we need that person in the room. Like, why would they want you in the room?

Sigal Zarmi

I think, I think for me personally, is because I would challenge the status quo. I always, I want to define myself as somebody who brings innovation, fresh thinking, and a different point of view to a conversation.

Because for me to come in and just say what everybody else is saying, there is not no point. I mean, why waste everybody's time if I'm just reiterating or regurgitating what everybody else said? And so my, my goal has always been, and that's why I was so excited to take the head of transformation role with Morgan Stanley cause I got the license to challenge people. That was my job, was to sit in the room and say, have you thought about this? And why you doing it this way? Can't you do it another way? Are we aggressive enough as we think about how we really need to transform? What are organizational obstacles that we really need to remove in order to go faster, increase velocity, be more flexible, delight our customers and all of that.

Mickey McManus

It seems like it's also, it's that notion of, that progressive alternative point of view is about helping ask a very different question or helping frame it with a different problem frame so that people can look at it differently and go, wow, you know, what, what's the lost opportunity if we don't do this too?

Sigal Zarmi

Or bring up a different way of thinking about it. That generates more discussion and a richer conversation, a more diverse conversation throughout the decision making. Because what you want, when you make a decision, you do want diverse opinions. And sometimes, you can generate that even if you have people of the same background in the room. Sometimes not. But what you do want for rich conversation and decision making is the diversity of opinion. And I want to be the one to make sure that in every conversation there is a diversity of opinion.

Mickey McManus

Hmm. Hey, Brad, how about you? Same question

Bradley Strock

so I've always, been a big believer in, that some of the most effective leadership comes from asking the right questions, are asking good questions and so much more effective than, than saying, Hey, we need to do X, Y, and Z. Is to ask questions that lead people to get to, and you're asking the questions, you may or may not have an idea what you think the answer is, but, asking the questions and asking the five why's to get to the deeper insights, um, mm-hmm. is something that I've always, um, that I've always believed in and tried to practice and hone as a skill, I think in the context of the senior advisor program. I would say that, involving a senior advisor like Sigal or myself or some of our many other talented SA's is really bringing that practitioner credibility to the client and just seeing whether it's in, a pitch or in a case, that, that perspective, whether it's asking the questions or challenging as Sigal said, or even just saying, here is my experiences and how it aligns, um, I think is, is is incredibly powerful in bringing credibility and also, getting to even better solutions that add value for the client. Where we've done that, where I've seen that happen, it's added a ton of value.

Mickey McManus

Mm-hmm.

Bradley Strock

I think, you know, part of what, seems an opportunity to me is to be able to really do that more.

Mickey McManus

And you're a proxy for the customer. You're a proxy for that CIO on the other side or the CFO or someone, and you can ask those questions so they don't fall on their face when they get out there with the real customer. Or you can probably sensitize people to, this is a big transformation they're going through. This is what's going on in the heads of the senior leaders. This is what they're concerned about right now, let's help them change as well. What do you, Sigal you look like You might have a question.