Michael Good, the inventor of MusicXML
    Philip

    Welcome back everybody to another Scoring Notes podcast, where we talk all about music notation software and related technology. And this one is a rerun, but with a quick update.

    I'm back with David MacDonald, my cohost. Hi David.

    David

    How's it going, Philip?

    Philip

    It's going great. So we had a discussion with Michael Good, the inventor of MusicXML, just a little less than a year ago. And it went really well. MusicXML, as you know, and many of our listeners know, is the interchange format that many hundreds of applications, music applications, including all the ones that we speak about on this program, use to exchange musical information with each other.

    And we thought we would re-air the interview that we had with Michael, because he talks all about how MusicXML came to be in light of the fact that there have been a couple of important updates to MusicXML in the year or so. That's passed since we talked to Michael.

    David

    Yeah, MusicXML. One of the things that might not be obvious, because it is not itself a product that you buy, but it is in active development and changing all the time. New products are coming out to support it, and being updated to support the new features and standard of MusicXML, and so we've had some news in that arena.

    Philip

    Absolutely. The first of those is that MusicXML 4.0, which Michael actually talked about, that was to come at the time that he spoke with us, has now been released. It was released, pretty much concurrently, with Finale version 27 in June of 2021. And there are a lot of new features in MusicXML 4.0, or four point zero, if you like.

    Some of the biggies are things like concert scores with transposed parts, the relationships between the score and parts, there's a standard way to combine the score and parts in a single compressed dot MXL file. There's score-following assessment tools, which was a very important part of the Finale version 27 update. Swing playback, Roman numerals, Nashville numbers.

    And crucially, I think for a lot of people that rely on MusicXML, the complete documentation is now on the W3C site, including examples of every MusicXML element. And that is the consortium…

    David

    The World Wide Web Consortium. They define how web pages can be, or should be structured, so that your browser can read them whether you're in Safari or Firefox or Chrome, or whatever you're using. And they also maintain a lot of other technical specifications that are adjacent to that sort of thing, such as the MusicXML standard.

      0:00 / 58:42